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HOW TO BOOK YOUR AUDITION

 

We’ve recently enhanced our audition process, so please read carefully and make sure you follow the process.

 

  1. Review the audition requirements
  2. Fill out your ELECTRONIC form and submit for each individual who is requesting an audition.
  3. Submit your form, you will receive confirmation of date and time for your audition.

If you have any questions you can email directly to auditions@orangevillemusictheatre.com

When Lerner and Loewe’s My Fair Lady opened on Broadway, it collected six Tony Awards, including Best Musical, while the film version took home eight Oscars, including Best Picture. Based on George Bernard Shaw’s play Pygmalion, My Fair Lady is that rare musical by which all others are measured. The tale of a cockney flower girl transformed into an elegant lady features one of musical theatre’s greatest scores, including: “Wouldn’t It Be Loverly?,” “With a Little Bit of Luck,” “The Rain in Spain,” “I Could Have Danced All Night,” “On the Street Where You Live,” “Get Me to the Church on Time,” and “I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face.”

Eliza Doolittle is a young flower seller with an unmistakable Cockney accent which keeps her in the lower rungs of Edwardian society. When Professor Henry Higgins tries to teach her how to speak like a proper lady, an unlikely friendship begins to flourish.  

AUDITION REQUIREMENTS

If you are looking to audition for a specific role the desired audition songs are listed with characters below. If you are unsure of which role you wish to audition for or are auditioning for the ensemble sing a song of your choosing with instrumental track, accapella is not advised

 

 

Roles-My Fair Lady

Henry Higgins

Male

Lead

Baritone

 

Eliza Doolittle

Female

Lead

Soprano

 

Colonel Pickering

Male

Lead

Baritone

 

Freddy Eynsford-Hill

Male

Supporting

Tenor

 

Mrs. Higgins

Female

Supporting

Spoken

 

Mrs. Pearce

Female

Supporting

Mezzo-Soprano

 

Professor Zoltan Karpathy

Male

Supporting

Spoken

 

Alfred P. Doolittle

Male

Supporting

Baritone

 

Mrs. Eynsford-HIll

Female

Featured

 

A Bystander

Either or Both

Featured

Spoken

 

Costmongers (4)

Male

Featured

 

Butler

Male

Featured

Spoken

 

Footman

Male

Featured

Silent

 

Lord Boxington

Male

Featured

 

Lady Boxington

Female

Featured

 

Flower Girl

Female

Featured

 

Footman

Male

Featured

Spoken

 

Selsey Man

Male

Featured

Spoken

 

Hoxton Man

Male

Featured

Spoken

 

Queen of Transylvania

Female

Featured

Spoken

 

Harry

Male

Featured

Bass

 

Jamie

Male

Featured

Tenor

 

Mrs. Hopkins

Female

Featured

 

George

Male

Featured

 

Maid (2)

Female

Ensemble

Silent

 

Busker (3)

Either or Both

Ensemble

Silent

 

Servant (6)

Either or Both

Ensemble

 

Steward (2)

Male

Ensemble

 

 

 

 

Ensemble

Either or Both

Ensemble

 

Footman 2

Male

Ensemble

Silent

 

 

 

 

 

Please note if you wish to have a speaking role we will need to hear the monologues in the appropriate accent this is most important for Eliza and we will need to hear your cockney and proper British accent

 

Monologue choice 1


No, no, I can't afford 'em, gov'ner. Neither could you if you was as poor as me. Not that I mean any 'arm, mind you, but if Eliza's getting a bit out of this, why not me too? Eh? Why not? Well, look at it my way - what am I? I ask you, what am I? I'm one of the undeserving poor, that's what I am. Now think what that means to a man. It means that he's up against middle-class morality for all of time. If there's anything going, and I puts in for a bit of it, it's always the same story: "you're undeserving, so you can't have it." But my needs is as great as the most deserving widows that ever got money out of six different charities in one week for the death of the same 'usband. I don't need less than a deserving man, I need more! I don't eat less 'earty than 'e does, and I drink, oh, a lot more. I'm playin' straight with you. I ain't pretendin' to be deserving. No, I'm undeserving. And I mean to go on being undeserving. I like it and that's the truth. But, will you take advantage of a man's nature to do 'im out of the price of 'is own daughter what he's brought up, fed and clothed by the sweat of 'is brow till she's growed big enough to be interesting to you two gentlemen? Well, is five pounds unreasonable? I'll put it to you, and I'll leave it to you

 

Monologue choice 2

 

My aunt died of influenza, so they said. But it's my belief they done the old woman in. Yes Lord love you! Why should she die of influenza when she come through diphtheria right enough the year before? Fairly blue with it she was. They all thought she was dead. But my father, he kept ladling gin down her throat. Then she come to so sudden that she bit the bowl off the spoon. Now, what would you call a woman with that strength in her have to die of influenza, and what become of her new straw hat that should have come to me? Somebody pinched it, and what I say is, them that pinched it, done her in. Them she lived with would have killed her for a hatpin, let alone a hat. And as for father ladling the gin down her throat, it wouldn't have killed her. Not her. Gin was as mother's milk to her. Besides, he's poured so much down his own throat that he knew the good of it.

 

Monologues choice 3
 

Hmmm. Eliza, you are to stay here for the next six months learning how to speak beautifully, like a lady in a florist shop. If you're good and do whatever you are told, you shall sleep in a proper bedroom, have lots to eat, and money to buy chocolates and take rides in taxis. But if you are naughty and idle you shall sleep in the back kitchen amongst the black beetles, and be walloped by Mrs. Pearce with a broomstick. At the end of six months you shall be taken to Buckingham Palace in a carriage, beautifully dressed. If the King finds out that you are not a lady, the police will take you to the Tower of London, where your head will be cut off as a warning to other presumptuous flower girls (Eliza looks up at him terrified) But if you are not found out, you shall have a present of seven-and-six to start life with as a lady in a shop. If you refuse this offer you will be a most ungrateful wicked girl; and the angels will weep for you. (Seeing by Eliza's reaction that she has understood every word he turns to Pickering, his former tone instantly changed to one of good humor) Now are you satisfied, Pickering?

 

 

 

Song Choices

If you are Auditioning for Eliza Please prepare: Show Me and I Could Have Danced All Night

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apkwEbd6eTc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WCVV2EThzIs

 

If you are auditioning for Henry Higgins please prepare Why can’t the English and I am an ordinary man:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FdWoZZixI-I

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9CIvYt0FHs

 

If you are auditioning for the Colonel please prepare You did it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mu6vJGD5O-Y

 

If you are Auditioning for Freddy please prepare on the street where you live:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYGcjGRc-yA

 

If you are not sure of the role you would like or are only interested in ensemble please prepare any song from the show that best suits your voice!

 

We look forward to meeting you!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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